Tips and Techniques

If your artwork has a lot of heavy deep blue areas chances are real good that it will look like purple when it is actually printed. When deep blues are built from process colors they are built primarily out of cyan and magenta. 

 

Lots of design ideas look great in front of your computer but don’t always work the way you plan after your final product is received. Just one example is applying outside borders. Let’s take business cards as an example.

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 Tip 1 Before & After

What does Vector mean, and what’s so great about it? You may have heard the term “Vector Image” when you ask your printer what they need for files. A “vector image” is a mathematically based image as opposed to a “continuous tone” image, which is what your camera takes and is also always used for web graphics.

 

“I HAVE A SMALL BUSINESS & IN AN EFFORT TO CONTROL MY OPERATING COSTS I KEEP AS LITTLE INVENTORY AS I CAN ON HAND OF EVERYTHING”
This has become a common thought process with any sized business, but keeping low inventories doesn’t necessarily mean you will be saving money.

Many people don’t realize it, but graphics that look great on the web will usually look horrible when they are used to print from.

 

Have you ever noticed that your big black areas look fine on your computer but prints gray when you send it to your printer? It is always important to remember that RGB and CMYK work completely differently. This problem can be resolved by building a “Rich Black” for your large black areas.

 

To all of you Adobe Photoshop Pros out there, it is without any argument that there is nothing like Adobe Photoshop for photos and continuous tone images, but don’t kid yourself into thinking it’s for everything.
When Adobe Photoshop is used for setting type it becomes inevitable that your file will be flattened (usually sooner than later) and your type now becomes part of your image. Once this happens ..